Skincare Review: Does Pearl Powder Really Work as Skincare?

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I have been hearing about using genuine pearl powder as a skincare for a while now. Girls have been swearing by it to get whiter, smoother, and younger skin. To be honest, I believe it. And not because I’m naive, I have my reason.

Pearl powder has been used as skincare for centuries by royal families in Asia. Even to this day, I’m sure you notice that there are many skincare products (essences, masks, lotion, etc.) that contain pearl extracts in them.

As per google, pearls also contain a lot of amino acids (which stimulates your skin cells to produce more collagen), minerals (which gives the skin a healthy complexion), and high levels of calcium (which promotes skin regeneration and moisture). Sounds pretty much like pure fcking magic.

As I previously blogged in my CC cushion review, I had vacayed in China recently and I stopped by Suzhou. The city is super-duper well known for producing freshwater pearls, so I was like, yassss, this is my chance to get my hands on some fine-ass pearl powder.

Let’s take a look at what I was able to get my hands on:

I purchased this at a large freshwater pearl factory in Suzhou for RMB 50 (that’s about USD 7.25) per box. I was uber surprised at how inexpensive pearl powder is, I was prepared to pay bigger bucks for this- like you know how pricey pearl jewelry can get. I learned that pearl powder is actually very economical because freshwater pearls are cheaper than saltwater pearls, and that they use the pearls that do not meet the beauty standards to be made into jewelry (which is a lot of them).

In each box, there is 8 vials of freshwater pearl powder and a little informational sheet of paper that gives us some info on the powder. Each vile is approximately, 1 in (~2.54 cm) in height. I also noticed that the vials are only like 75% full, but I was fine with that considering how much I paid for it.

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The powder is 100% of pure freshwater pearls and it is food grade- my motto is, if it’s safe to eat, it’s pretty much safe for every-fcking-thing else.

So, what makes me think that I wasn’t scammed into buying fake pearl powder. Well, gurl, I did my research.

Real pearl powder has a slight fishy smell to it. The power is a matte white in color and should not have any light reflective particles in the powder. When you rub it against your fingers, it should feel like a smooth fine powder- none of that sandy, bumpy, or coarse texture bullsht. When rubbing onto your skin, it should disappear into the skin and it shouldn’t leave much residue.

I have been mixing the the pearl powder into my lotion on my palm before applying to my face. I can confirm that the powder does indeed makes my skin whiter, but it’s more of a temporary thing. Right after applying, it makes my skin feel smooth and matte, which is awesome because my face oils so much. I am constantly try new products to control my face’s sebum production.

However, I can’t say much for the pearl’s claim to skin regeneration and collagen production :/ Maybe, I need to use this regularly for a longer period of time to see results? Or, it could be that I’m still pretty young, think like very early 20’s, to be needing collagen. But I’m still hoping for the skin regeneration claim to be true, so I can rid my acne scars!

Now, what if I use the pearl powder in a mask? Will that reap me more skin benefits? Don’t worry, I gotchu. I googled up a simple diy pearl powder mask and got right to it.

I dumped in 1 vial of pearl powder (that’s like half a teaspoon), 1 teaspoon of 1% milk (because that’s the only milk I had in the fridge), and 1 teaspoon of honey (all the better if it’s organic). I mixed it to the best that I could with a brush and applied it to my cleansed face, except for my eye area ofc.

The powder took some effort to get mixed into the mask and the mask looked a little nasty on my skin. But, hey, at least it smelled good because of the honey and the mask wasn’t messy, no drips or anything.

I let the mask sit on my face for like 15-20 minutes and then rinsed off with water.

The result? I think I kinda love it. It washed off my face easy and left my face bright, soft, smooth, and matte. The next morning, my skin looks brighter than usual and not as greasy as my face typically is. I’m def adding this to my skincare routine on a weekly basis.

Does pearl powder really work as skincare? Yes. Yes, it does.

ps. this made me think of Legend of the Blue Sea and how Sim Cheong cries pearls. Is her skin so absolutely perfect because she crushes her pearls to a powder and uses it as her secret mermaid skin regiment??? What do you think about my theory? It sounds pretty fcking legit to me.

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Author: thecrazyandlazy

Based in New York City, I'm all about snacking, drama-ing, skincare, online shopping, and anything green tea-ed or matcha powdered. Join me on these everyday experiences through my reviews and rants ^__^

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